SHARE

Johanna Konta has criticised coverage of women’s tennis and believes the sport deserves ‘more credit’ for the skill showcased by its leading lights.
Who’s right? Tackling the controversial rule that’s divided Djokovic, Nadal and Federer The British No. 1 hailed the quality of the WTA Tour and believes the attitude to ‘open’ draws plays down the strength in depth it possesses.

While female tennis players are paid the same as their male counterparts at Grand Slam events, they still lag behind in terms of prize money throughout the entire year.
The men’s ATP World Tour had a total prize pot of £147.6million, compared to the the £103.77m on offer for the WTA Tour, and while tennis is arguably the leading light in sporting equality – in terms of gender at least – there is still plenty more to be done.
Konta admitted she was unhappy with how segregated men’s and women’s tennis is and doesn’t see why people can’t compare Serena Williams to Roger Federer. Konta thinks Serena should be compared to Federer And after her quarter-final match with Simona Halep was named the most-watched match at Wimbledon, she recalled her disappointment in the gender bias displayed in covering that particular statistic.
‘When people commented on my match being the most-watched match of the Championships, they put it very much in a female context,’ she told Reuters at the Wuhan Open. ‘I thought ‘well, why does it need to be in a female context? It’s a tennis match. Part of an event’ Federer and the ATP Tour enjoy more prize money ‘I think that’s what makes sport very beautiful: it isn’t gender-biased technically, everyone is out there doing the work and trying to be the best they can be.

‘It’s important to acknowledge the great qualities of both men and women in sport and not segregate them, because you will find very similar qualities in Serena Williams and Roger Federer. ‘More credit needs to be given. There is so much talk that the women’s draw is so open. But it’s open in the sense of there are so many amazing players. We have the depth.
(Metro)