SHARE

From David Bowie to Prince to Leonard Cohen, we lost a lot of iconic musicians last year alone. We mourn their loss with broken hearts. However, great music as we knew it has been dying out for quite some time.

It is breathing its last in the souls of a few millennials who weep the loss of an iconic era. There is a massive chasm between the lyrics now and lyrics then. The contrast is clear and unbelievable and the reality is this change is not for the greater good.

For many people, music used to play an important role. Lyrics used to be inspiring, encouraging and memorable. Music used to be more than just ‘entertainment’. We grew up listening to profound creations by songwriters who went down in history as some of the greatest contributors to the world of artistry. Sadly, the times have changed and the breed of musical geniuses is now non-existent.

The Grammys, previously given away to legends such as Sting, Paul McCartney and Eric Clapton, are now nominating children like Justin Bieber, who has barely lived long enough to achieve such greatness, let alone deserve the honour.

 

Over the years, cheap gimmicks have replaced true artistry and we grieve for the loss. We fear for what is yet to come even more so. The essence of true music, the soul reaching lyrics have been replaced by shallow derogatory words in incorrect grammar strung together to make a nonsensical string of sounds emanating from the mouths of mainstream auto-tuned individuals. This is then wrapped up in shiny costumes and released to the wild for the current generation to twerk to.

These so-called ‘music tracks’ make those of us who grew up with actual music, cringe. They’re so different from the legendary songs that once held the power to trigger revolutions. There used to be a message or a story that spoke to millions, shaping their ideologies. Back in the day, artistes didn’t have advanced technology to bank upon or use as distraction. They had to exercise real talent to connect with people.

This is not in any way a rant about tastes. It is about quality. The quality of good music, real music has gone down so much; it has cheapened its true value and we have an entire generation who find themselves starved of good music. The tragedy of this entire fiasco is the fact that they are unaware of how little nutrition they are getting.

Nobody listens to any of the lyrics any more. They just crave the beats. The same tempo buildup, the forgettable lyrics somewhere in between, a big beat drop, and the final BOOM – it is unimaginative and utterly mundane. This has become a gullible generation of morose listeners who will allow any amount of mindless nonsense to be shoved down their ears IF it has enough ratings and is in the top charts.

All of this is dumbing us down slowly, step by step, until we accept anything given to us despite the obvious lack of essence.

How do you feel when you sing along to ‘One Dance’ by Drake? Especially the line ‘I need a one dance’? What are these people tripping on when they write, anyway? Grammar has clearly died along with common sense.

Brilliant genres are going downhill as well. Take rap, for example. It used to be about society and culture, equality and freedom. However now, the successors of hip hop come across as sexed-up, bling-crazy fools who’ll spit out anything to look cool.

“Shake that ass, bitch/Nigga got them monies,” isn’t hot. It isn’t even remotely appealing to the ears let alone the mind.

We’re hooked to these ‘hits’ churned out by wannabes. Sadly, they’re topping charts worldwide and winning the big awards. And in the end, when all is done and it’s time to go home, we’re left with a sad generation of wannabes who swallowed everything they were handed out with emptied heads and even emptier imaginations. That is what we’re left with. And that is the sad state of the world.