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‘The world today doesn’t make sense, so why should I paint pictures that do?’
So, allegedly, said Pablo Picasso in a shrewd attempt to justify his love of putting noses where noses don’t actually go. It is imperative that you now hold this profound quotation firmly in your mind whilst you watch ‘YouTube Poop’ (YTP).

Beginning in the early Noughties, this cultural movement is characterised by confusing and shocking edits of Saturday-morning cartoons, video games, and viral videos. Even the US presidential debate has not been spared. Though the genre has declined in popularity, the YTP is, nonetheless, one of the defining innovations of our era.

Those in the Poop community don’t actually like being labelled as artists, as one Yale student found out when he attempted to define them as such on the University’s technology blog. Though they have been compared to Dadaism, YTPs are more vile, violent, and most importantly, nonsensical than most artworks, but this is precisely why they are an asset to our age. In a world where – sorry Pablo, you got nothing on us – absolutely zero things makes sense, it is time for the YTP to have a comeback.

Despite its seeming randomness, the world of YTP is not without its rules. ‘Poopisms’ are the common techniques and tricks used in videos to ensure they qualify as a true Poop. They include ‘stutter loops’ (the repetition of clips over and over), ‘staredowns’ (freezing the frame on a particular facial expression), and the questionably-named ‘ear rape’ (suddenly increasing the volume to shock the viewer). One of the most humorous techniques is ‘sentence mixing’: forcing characters to say new sentences by cutting and splicing things they have said.

There are also firm rules about what not to do. Panning across a clip without adding another Poopism at the same time is considered boring, whilst using your own voice to dub clips is seen as amateur. By far the biggest barrier that Poopers face in creating their videos, however, is the law.

Despite what many eight-year-olds on YouTube think, declaring that something is a ‘parody’ in the description of a video does not make it exempt from copyright laws. Even the iron fist of the law cannot truly stop Poopers, who are still going (relatively) strong after the first YTP was created in 2004. YouTube Poops now even have their own Wikipedia page, as well as a page on TV Tropes and a WikiHow guide on how to create them.

YouTube Poops have therefore undoubtedly secured their place in history, and whilst you might wander into a comment section to declare ‘What have I just watched?’, remember that Pablo Picasso once said: “The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.”
New Statesman