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Microsoft HoloLens, the world’s first, self-contained holographic computer, was made available for pre-order in Australia, Ireland, France, Germany, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, last week Hot on the heels of the announcement comes even more exciting news that Duke neurosurgeons are testing Hololens as an AR assist on tricky procedures.

Andrew Cutler and Shervin Rahimpour
Andrew Cutler and Shervin Rahimpour

A pair of neurosurgeons at Duke, Andrew Cutler and Shervin Rahimpour are working with Microsoft HoloLens to reduce the risk of ‘blind’ surgeries where it just isn’t possible to see what you’re doing.

3D images gleaned from CT scans are superimposed on the subject’s head — in it, really — using a Microsoft Hololens headset. Surgeons claim that, despite certain technical issues the precise motion tracking of Hololens prevents things like lag and jittery images.
“Since we can manipulate a hologram without actually touching anything, we have access to everything we need without breaking a sterile field. In the end, this is actually an improvement over the current OR system because the image is directly overlaid on the patient, without having to look to computer screens for aid,” said Cutler in a Duke news release.

Although no human trial has been done yet, the method seems promising, says surgeons.

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  • s faro

    the HoloLens is being demoed in Sri Lanka since Friday (14th October) at the Commonwealth Medical Conference. I think today is the last day.