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Science Fiction is not just for the nerds and the geeks. The general populace loved some of the science fiction movies so much that sci-fi has managed to rock the cinemas for over a century. However, there are certain movies that are almost essential viewing for any sci-fi fan. Our decision to create a list of top ten must watch sci-fi movies was not an easy decision because of the sheer number of good sci-fi movies out there.

We looked for films that would represent science fiction well to a new audience and totally rock a neophyte’s brain, and managed to trickle the numbers down. Apologies in advance if your all time favourite has been excluded!

P.S. We decided to exclude franchises such as Star Wars, Star Trek, The Matrix and Back To the Future because they are too awesome to be in some list. Enjoy!

Alien (1979, dir. Ridley Scott)
This film didn’t just launch Scott and star Sigourney Weaver — it also launched a whole genre of movies about our terrifying encounters with creatures beyond our own imagination. Scott merged space opera, Westerns and horror in a way that pretty much nobody had done before, and the result remains vivid today. With a sharp script by Dan O’Bannon and note-perfect direction by Scott, this is a master class on how to do creepiness and a compelling story in the sterility of deep space. And you really have to see the sequel, directed by James Cameron, which is a defining moment in the history of military science fiction and space opera.

Her (2013, Dir. Spike Jonze)
We dithered about whether to include this film, because it’s sort of a flawed gem. But it’s also a hugely-important film about our relationship with technology and how our devices are changing us and making us both smarter and more dependent. In a future where your smartphone really is smarter than you are, what does it mean to fall in love with your technology? And can that technology really love us back, the way we want it to?

Primer (2004, dir. Shane Carruth)
Primer is famous as a film that you need to watch a few times before you fully grasp what’s going on, and there’s never been a movie that was less eager to explain itself to its audience. The opening, in which a couple of nerds tinkering in their garage randomly hit on an amazing discovery, is one of the great iconic nerd scenes of all time, and then the movie just gets crazier and crazier, with our heroes going back in time a few times too often until they descend into a kind of insanity. It is worth watching just for the Walkman scene. This film is what Lost was trying to do with its own time travel stories.

Metropolis (1927, dir. Fritz Lang)
This film is one of the most formative works of science fiction of all time, and its imagery remains potent nearly 80 years later. And now that there’s a fully-restored version finally hitting cinemas — for the first time ever, outside of Germany — you can finally appreciate Fritz Lang’s vision in its entirety. With its uniquely weird storyline involving a worker’s uprising and a woman’s robot duplicate, Metropolis remains a source of fascination — but it’s also the source of much of the work that comes after it.

Wall-E (2008, dir. Andrew Stanton)
American cinema has pumped out post-apocalyptic stories like a doom factory over the past decade or so. But few of them manage to be as hopeful, or as sweet, as this story of a robot that’s left alone on an abandoned Earth, turning all our garbage into cubes and studying the remnants of our culture. This movie turns into a love story, as the stranded Wall-E encounters another robot, and that in turn becomes the story of how human beings can find redemption through our own creations.

Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind (2004, dir. Michel Gondry)
This film works on so many levels. It’s a metaphor for the ways in which you try to erase someone from your memories and your life, after a breakup, in order to reinvent yourself as a single person. And yet, the film manages to suggest, that process is a form of suicide — you have to destroy a piece of your life in order to excise your former lover from it. And since that process is also the reverse of falling in love, maybe it leads you to realize why you fell for the other person in the first place. But Eternal Sunshine is also an incredibly clever science fiction movie that introduces a bizarre new technology in a way that’s both surreal and believable.

Ex Machina (2015, dir. Alex Garland)
Like Her, this is a vital film about our relationship with technology, and it asks the key questions that we’re all struggling with in our Twitterpated era. In this case, instead of a smartphone in love, it’s an android that’s irresistibly beautiful and vulnerable. A man goes to a secret A.I. lab in the middle of nowhere to meet a machine that can think for it—not realizing that he, not she, is the experiment.

E.T. (1982, dir. Steven Spielberg)
A lot of people may hate on this film, but it changed the way we see first contact with aliens as much as Close Encounters of the Third Kind did. And E.T. was one of the first really compelling aliens ever to appear on the big screen. E.T. takes the sense of wonder from Close Encounters and makes it more intimate and personal. This is also the movie in which Spielberg’s obsessions with fatherhood, children and discovery resonate the best. But also, from a technical standpoint, it’s an amazing achievement — rewatch it sometime, and look at how everything is presented from a child’s eye-level, and the mom is the only adult whose face we see in the first two acts. Spielberg uses lighting, camera angles and dialog to make a film that’s not just about childhood, but told from a child’s point of view.

Doctor Strangelove (1964, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
There were a number of great apocalyptic movies during the height of the Cold War, including 1959’s On The Beach. What makes Doctor Strangelove a science fiction classic is first of all, that it invests so much energy into inventing strange new ideas like the doomsday device that forces global annihilation in the event of an attack. And the network of underground survival tunnels, where important men and a large number of women will wait out the nuclear winter. But most of all, writer Terry Southern’s satirical gem gives us amazing insight into the psychology of apocalypse, showing us just what sort of men would doom the entire world on purpose.

Looper (2012, dir. Rian Johnson)
Here’s another great time-travel movie, in which a man is at war with himself in a kind of echo of Twelve Monkeys. Once again, Bruce Willis goes back in time — but in this universe, you can actually change the future through your actions in the past. (As proved by a horrific mutilation scene early on in the film.) Willis wants to fix his mistakes by rewriting history, but finds out that it’s not that simple. The transition from the citified first half to the countrified second half is beautiful and marks a shift in our understanding of the film’s story as a whole.

Wall-E (2008, dir. Andrew Stanton)
American cinema has pumped out post-apocalyptic stories like a doom factory over the past decade or so. But few of them manage to be as hopeful, or as sweet, as this story of a robot that’s left alone on an abandoned Earth, turning all our garbage into cubes and studying the remnants of our culture. This movie turns into a love story, as the stranded Wall-E encounters another robot, and that in turn becomes the story of how human beings can find redemption through our own creations.

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow
The story of DC’s Legends of Tomorrow revolves around the concepts of the legion of Time masters that patrol and protect the time-stream from those who would warp or change history to their benefit, while guarding the secrets of the multiverse. The Swarnavahini television channel, recently launched its first-ever DC series, ‘Legends of Tomorrow’. The subtitled 45 minute-long episodes will be aired every Saturday at 7 pm.

The American action-adventure television series, DC’s Legends of Tomorrow is developed by Greg Berlanti, Marc Guggenheim, Andrew Kreisberg and Phil Klemmer, who are also executive producers along with Sarah Schechter and Chris Fedak. Being aired on the CW, it’s a spin-off from the CW’s most successful TV series, Arrow and The Flash – while prevailing in a similar fictional universe.

The cast consists of a star-studded line up featuring some of the most prominent characters from the DC multi universe while Victor Garber plays the role as Dr. Martin Stein, Brandon Routh as Ray Palmer/Atom, Wentworth Miller as Leonard Snart/Captain Cold, Arthur Darvillas Rip Hunter, Franz Drameh as Jefferson ‘Jax’ Jackson/Firestorm, Dominic Purcell as Mick Rory/ Heat Wave, CaityLotz as Sara Lance/ Black Canary, Amy Pemberton as Gideon and Ciara Renée as Kendra Saunders/Hawk Girl.