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Sprinkle salt from high so it evenly distributes. If you just put a little it sticks to one piece no matter how much you stir it. Most people put too much salt in the beginning and too much in the end of cooking. If you put a little bit throughout the entire process it’s going to be so much better

Are you a cook? Do you like to cook? If so, here are a few important tips you might want to remember, to make your food so much yummier.

1. Make perfectly shaped burger patties by throwing them against your cutting board to prevent air bubbles, then pressing a dimple into the middle to keep them from puffing up too much.

Throwing the portioned beef against a cutting board gets rid of air bubbles, and a dimple in the centre prevents the burgers from puffing up too much in the middle while they cook.

2. Save the stems of herbs like parsley and cilantro and add them to soups, stews or stocks while cooking.

One thing that restaurant cooks are really good at is putting every scrap to use. After you’ve picked the leaves off of your fresh herbs, keep the stems in a plastic bag in the refrigerator and use them to flavour anything that you’ll simmer for a long time on the stove. When you’re ready to use the stems, tie them together with either a long stem or some butcher’s twine, then add them to whatever you’re simmering. Before serving, just remember to remove the tied-up stems and throw them away.

3. Similarly, woody herbs like thyme or rosemary should also be bundled and tied with butcher’s twine before they’re added to the pot.

This way, you can just pull the whole thing out at the end of cooking. The herbs will flavour whatever you’re making while it simmers, and you won’t have to waste time picking the leaves off the stem at the beginning.

4. Have a bench scraper on hand at all times to get food and scraps off of your cutting board.

You can use it to transfer things from your cutting board into pots and bowls, and to wipe your board clean of any leftover food scraps. Using the bench scraper is cleaner and more efficient than using your hands. It also beats scraping things up with your knife, which will dull the blade and could also be a little dangerous.

5. Sprinkle salt from up high, and season your food at every stage of cooking.
Sprinkle salt from high so it evenly distributes. If you just put a little it sticks to one piece no matter how much you stir it. Most people put too much salt in the beginning and too much in the end of cooking. If you put a little bit throughout the entire process it’s going to be so much better.

6. Use a ‘roll cut’ to give things a varied texture, or to make a dish more visually interesting.

When you ‘roll cut’ something, the pieces you end up with will be thick in the centre and thin on the edges, so they’ll cook at slightly different rates and give your finished dish a more interesting texture.

7. It’s possible to get perfect, fluffy rice without a rice cooker. You just need to time it right.

Letting the rice rest, covered and off the heat, gives all the moisture a chance to settle, so that the rice on the bottom is just as fluffy as the rice on the top.

8. When you’re making fried rice, ‘prep’ your pan by frying an egg in it first.

It helps. It really does. I don’t know the scientific explanation but it helps.

9. Clarified butter adds the same delicious flavour as regular butter, but it’s better for most cooking since it doesn’t burn.

Regular butter is a combination of fat and milk solids, and the milk solids are what burn and turn black when you cook butter at too high a temperature. Clarified butter is just the fat, with the milk-solids taken out, which means you can heat it to a much higher temperature without it burning. Clarified butter is great for higher-heat cooking like pan-frying and roasting, and it’s super easy to make at home.

10. Always make biscuit dough by hand; don’t use a food processor or electric mixer.
The key to perfectly flaky biscuits is properly working the butter into the flour and other dry ingredients, and that’s much easier when you do it by hand. When you’re working butter into flour for a biscuit recipe it’ll say, ‘work the butter until it looks like coarse cornmeal.

11. Crack eggs on an even surface (like your counter or cutting board), instead of on the edge of a bowl.

You should always crack your eggs on a flat surface. When you crack on the bowl, the shell gets pushed inside the egg, not good.

12. Before you try and whisk the eggs, pierce the yolks with a fork.

Breaking the yolk first makes it much easier to blend everything together.

13. The only things you should be making in a nonstick skillet are eggs, pancakes, and maybe French toast.