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The best single-frame image of Pluto’s largest moon

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft snapped the first high-resolution photographs of Pluto and its moons this week. The images reveal the planetary system in unprecedented detail — highlighting mountain ranges, icy plains, deep canyons, and more. Planetary scientists are now using the images to figure out what they can learn about Pluto’s origins — based on the rock’s surface features.

The best part is there’s more to come. New Horizons has only sent back 1 to 2 percent of the data it has collected. The space probe has many more images of Pluto’s system to show us, and we’ll get those pictures over the next couple of weeks. Until then, check out the best images we got this week, when we celebrated the first ever flyby of dwarf planet Pluto.

Courtesy: http://www.theverge.com

Vocabulary
False color refers to a group of color, rendering methods used to display images in color which were recorded in the visible or non-visible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum.

The first close-up image of Charon’s surface, revealing a strange depressed mountain
The first close-up image of Charon’s surface, revealing a strange depressed mountain
The first high-resolution image of Pluto’s surface, revealing icy mountains
The first high-resolution image of Pluto’s surface, revealing icy mountains
Close-up view of Pluto’s “heart” region, which contains icy plains
Close-up view of Pluto’s “heart” region, which contains icy plains
A composite image of Pluto and its moon Charon
A composite image of Pluto and its moon Charon
Pluto and its largest moon, taken during New Horizons’ final approach
Pluto and its largest moon, taken during New Horizons’ final approach
The first up-close image of Pluto’s moon Nix
The first up-close image of Pluto’s moon Nix
The first up-close image of Pluto’s moon Hydra
The first up-close image of Pluto’s moon Hydra
False color images of the dwarf planet and its moon
False color images of the dwarf planet and its moon
New Horizons snapped this image from 476,000 miles away from  Pluto’s surface
New Horizons snapped this image from 476,000 miles away from
Pluto’s surface